Myth-Busting Common Misconceptions

3 min read
Are you guilty of believing these five driving-related myths? Get them out of your system, or it could cost you a pretty penny!

As motorists, we have come across all manner of driving-related tales. Some have a modicum of truth while others are blatantly misleading. Here, we hold a couple of them up to scrutiny.Myth 1: Rear Passengers Do Not Need To Use A Seatbelt
Many motorists are of the opinion that passengers in the backseat of a car are not required to use a seatbelt. This is not true. Whether you are in a hired car or are on the road with friends, you need to buckle up if you’re seated in the rear. Not doing so is considered an offence that can result in a fine of $120 for the passenger, while the driver would be fined the same amount and given a penalty of three demerit points. More importantly, wearing a seat belt can reduce injury severity and even save your life should you get into an accident.Myth 2: Sending An SMS While Driving Is Not An Offence 
Motorists have the misconception that typing or sending an SMS while the vehicle is on the move is not an offence. Handphone driving includes holding the mobile phone to type or send such messages. As long as the motorist has one hand on the steering wheel while the other hand is holding onto a telecommunication device, and is found to be communicating with the device, this would constitute an offence of handphone driving. If you need to send a message, drive to a safe place such as a car park and send the message only when the vehicle is stationary and safely parked. Besides, studies have found that texting while driving increases your chances of getting into crash by up to 23 times, so why would you even take that sort of risk?Myth 3: Using Your Mobile Phone At Petrol Stations Will Spark An Explosion 
The belief that phones emit high-energy radiation and are thus capable of causing explosions when they are used in or around petrol stations is fairly widespread among motorists. But experiments conducted with waves emitted by mobile phones have shown that this does not happen. The truth is that radiation from mobile phones in normal circumstances is too weak to spark an explosion. Want to find out how you should really behave in and around a petrol kiosk? Check out this article: https://aa-highway.com.sg/stay-safe-at-a-petrol-stationMyth 4: Resting In A Stationery Car After Consuming Alcohol Is Not An Offence Many Singaporean drivers think that resting in their car after a couple of drinks does not constitute a drink-driving offence. Unfortunately, by doing so, they could end up being charged with the intent of driving the vehicle and land themselves in jail.

Myth 5: Is It Okay To Be A Road Hog 
On the contrary, road hogging could earn you a fine of $1,000 and/or a jail term of three months and four demerit points for the first offence. So, if there is a vehicle travelling at a higher speed than you, you are well advised to move to the lane on your left and let it pass.